Australian Junior Women's Team selected for Thailand Tour

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Volleyball Australia is please to announce the Australian Junior Women's Team (1998/99) that will tour Thailand from 23rd April to 8th May.

The tour will see 12 athletes and 4 staff represent Australia at the Thailand Under 21 National Championships.​  Prior to the tournament, these athletes will participate in a training camp at the FIVB Development Centre in Bangkok.

Our Australian team will train, acclimatise and play matches against a number of strong opponents that will include Thailand Junior Provincial teams (Under 21's). This tour is a critical component of our preparation and development for the future, in particular for the Asian Junior Championship campaign in 2016.

Congratulations to the following athletes & staff on their selection;

  • Brooke Freckleton (VIC)
  • Jamie Clayden (ACT)
  • Tara Maland (SA)
  • Bailey Jones (QLD)
  • Kateia Barenaba (NSW)
  • Carrie Van Rensburg (VIC)
  • Holly Mallet (ACT)
  • Mikaela Stevens (NSW)
  • Courtney Durston (QLD)
  • Caitlin Waterfall (VIC)
  • Bridget O’Malley (NSW)
  • Sabine Mills (QLD)

 

Nam Pham (NSW) – Head Coach
Rachael Georgieff (QLD) – Assistant Coach
Carmaine Ng (VIC) – Physiotherapist/Trainer
Bill McHoul (VIC) – Head of Delegation/Team Manager




Australian's ready to storm the sand in China

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The last time the rest of the beach volleyball world saw Australia’s Isaac Kapa and Chris McHugh, they were standing on a podium in Austria proudly clutching bronze medals.

Team Kapa/McHugh had steamrolled their way past some of the biggest names on the world tour to achieve not only their best International results, but also one of the best ever by an Australian men’s team.

Referee appointments and International confirmations

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It has been a busy period for our International referees with a number of appointments for International tournaments confirmed.

 

Barnard and everyone associated with the fledgling International team had been impressed with the side’s progress during their first two Grand Prix games.

Sure, they lost to Kazakhstan and the Czech Republic in straight sets, but the Volleyroos showed plenty of the underdog spirit Barnard spoke so openly about in the event lead-up.

On Sunday, it was gone.

“We just did not play very well for probably 70 per cent of the match,” Barnard said.

“There were spurts there, but we were physically outmatched. We made way too many errors. The experience of being resilient, of going through that a lot of times and learning how to get out of it, we haven’t learned that.”

Barnard took the decision to give the players the morning off from training ahead of the Croatia game because he was worried about burn out.

He’s now not sure that was the right call.

“Maybe we should have pushed through it,” he said.

“But in the back of my mind I know they don’t play and train all the time, so it’s very easy to train them into the ground. Part of the intention today was to have them rest. I’m just not sure what the correlation between not doing anything this morning and the result this afternoon.”

The reality is this is a steep learning curve for the Volleyroos, and anyone who follows the sport in Australia knows this is the first step down a long and winding road.

Volleyball Australia President Craig Carracher knows.

“Let’s remember this is off the back of a decade of limited support,” he said after Sunday’s loss.

“This is the start of a rebuilding process, a process to create opportunity for a generation of players and coaches and administrators and officials.

“There are 200 countries playing women’s volleyball, and this was always going to be a long road. But we can’t not start the journey just because we know it’s a long and difficult one.”

Australia has the nucleus of a very good volleyball team, and with several players about to head to overseas leagues, and with several more hoping to follow, there is going to be more consistent exposure to the best.

But there are also a handful of players contemplating retirement. Some are listening to the protests of their own bodies, others are finding it difficult to balance full-time jobs with the commitment needed to play at the top level.

Which will leave enormous holes to fill. All the more reason Australia needs this Grand Prix experience to work.

Judging by the reaction of younger squad members like Nikki Cunningham and Jess Ryder, it’s a good news story so far.

“It’s a whole new level,” Ryder, who made her senior International debut against Kazakhstan on Friday, said.

“I can’t wait for the future years, when I can get on the court more, maybe even start on court.”

The immediate challenge for Australia, now they’ve taken one step back, is to move forward again next weekend in Croatia in week two of the Grand Prix.

 

WOMEN

BEACH

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